Viking West Kilbride

Our modern mind usually associates the word “Kirk” with the post-Reformation church. In many cases this is absolutely correct, but in fact the word “Kirk” has a much older history, and one that is relevant to our particular heritage. The lands to the West of where St Brides Roman Catholic Church now sits, have been

The Cup and Ring Markings, Blackshaw Estate

The Blackshaw Estate “Cup and Ring Markings” were discovered by D.A. Boyd and J.Smith in 1887. The find was communicated to the Society of Antiquaries by R.D. Cochran-Patrick. The full report can be read by clicking here. The area of rock, measuring 45ft in length by 19ft broad at one end, and 3ft broad at

How Old is the Main Street?

We have  discovered that our Kilbride became a distinguishable separate parish when we were separated from our mother Parish church to the North of Lamlash in 1567. We have also discovered that the name Kilbride first came into use for our church lands in 1337 when these lands, along with a large chunk of Arran

Where we began…(1337)

The Chapel of St Brigid at Margnaheglish, Arran In 1337, Sir John de Menteith gave a considerable amount of land to Kilwinning Abbey. These lands included a huge portion of Arran and also lands we now recognise as our village centre. In these medieval times the King owned all the lands but recognised feudal Earls

Origin of the Kilbride Name (680 years ago this year!)

I am finally finding a lot more detail on our village origins and I am currently working through how it all fits our history. Previously local historians had suggested we got the Kilbride name from an ancient church settlement in our area. This is a little true – I have been able to go right