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Age – Being West Kilbride

Category: Age

Death of Rev. John Lamb B.D.

Obituary taken from the Ardrossan & Saltcoats Herald, October 24th 1913 We regret to record the death on Tuesday morning, of the Rev. John Lamb B.D., minister of the parish of West Kilbride. Mr Lamb had been in failing health for some time, being troubled by a weakness of the heart and was confined to

Cholera!

It was the day before Christmas Eve in 1831 when Cholera first hit Scotland. Known as the pestilence (or the “pest”, which my grandmother used to call me), it spread quickly throughout the west of Scotland – the area worst affected by far. In Glasgow, over 3,000 souls would lose their life, Paisley 450, and

Burking and the Paisley Cholera Riots

We looked at the crowded, unhealthy living conditions of the poor in West Kilbride during the 1820’s – here. In 1826 the Liverpool Mercury reported the curious case of 33 dead bodies that had been found covered in salt and ready for shipment to a surgeon in Edinburgh. The bodies had been removed from graves

West Kilbride in the 1820’s

Life was generally not good in West Kilbride at the start of the 19th Century. More than half of the village lived in squalid, cramped conditions in tenement buildings on the now vacant King’s Arms Car Park. Between 1795 when the rather romantic picturesque village was described by the Rev Oughterson, until 1832 when Cholera

Portencross, The Great Haffue?

We have recently been looking at the origin of Halfway Street, or the Haef Weg. In this 19th Century map we¬†see that Halfway extended all the way to Portencross Castle and the harbour. Where do we get the idea that Halfway derives from Haef Weg or “the way to the sea”? In old Norse the

The Origin Myth of Portencross Castle

With my apologies to the Friends of Portencross whose continued hard work earns my greatest admiration and respect, but I feel the truth must out. The Myth A favourite local history myth is that the Boyd family built Portencross Castle around 1375. In April 2008, Glasgow University Archaeological Research Division (GUARD) said ” The medieval

Derivation of Place Names: Farland Head

Recently we have been exploring our Nordic past (see this post) as expressed in the place names of the Portencross area. We know that, prior to his mysterious death and beheading at the Battle of Renfrew (1164), we were part of the territory of Somerled mac Gillebride, the Norse-Gaelic King of Mann and Lord of

Viking West Kilbride

Our modern mind usually associates the word “Kirk” with the post-Reformation church. In many cases this is absolutely correct, but in fact the word “Kirk” has a much older history, and one that is relevant to our particular heritage. The lands to the West of where St Brides Roman Catholic Church now sits, have been

The Cup and Ring Markings, Blackshaw Estate

The Blackshaw Estate “Cup and Ring Markings” were discovered by D.A. Boyd and J.Smith in 1887. The find was communicated to the Society of Antiquaries by R.D. Cochran-Patrick. The full report can be read by clicking here. The area of rock, measuring 45ft in length by 19ft broad at one end, and 3ft broad at